Banga soup Recipe: Delight In This Delicious Nigerian Soup

Banga soup

When it comes to soup recipes, the use and combination of the ingredients used in cooking make all the difference in the world. And Banga Soup Recipe is no different, where there is a distinctive difference between Banga soup and other soups, this is a popular soup that can only be made by adding some special ingredients, which are a secret to most people. On this page, I’ll share with you a Banga soup recipe which will help you add more taste and flavour.

One of the most nourishing soups you can cook using palm nuts is Banga soup. All it takes is a variety of spice flavourings, a variety of meats and fish, and a bit of beletete to enrich this soup. It’s a simple recipe with fantastic results.

What exactly is Banga Soup Recipe?

Banga soup is a tasty soup made from palm nut fruit, spices, and various meats and seafood. It is a popular soup in Nigeria’s Niger Delta, notably among the Urhobo and Itsekiri ethnic groups.

Banga, also known as palm nut soup, is a famous dish not just in Nigeria but also in Ghana and Cameroon.

Banga Soup Recipe is known as abenkwan in Ghana. It is known as Mbanga in Cameroon. In Nigeria, it is known as Banga soup, with variations such as ofe akwu, oghwo amiedi, or izuwo ibiedi depending on tribe, ingredients, and method of cooking.

Banga soup is served with various meals like fufu, banku, eba, pounded yam, rice, boiling plantains, and so on.

The Health Benefit of Banga Soup

It is mineral-rich.

It has unsaturated fat.

Helps to treat vitamin A deficiency

Vitamin K-rich

 antioxidant-rich

Contains a variety of nutrients that promote healthy brain function and much more etc.

If the high-calorie level turns you off, I urge you to reconsider and not miss out on this delectable soup.

Palm oil has been scientifically proven to protect the heart and blood vessels against plaques and ischemic damage, according to a study. Consuming palm oil as a dietary fat as part of a healthy balanced diet does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

If the high-calorie level turns you off, I urge you to reconsider and not miss out on this delectable soup.

Ingredients: What exactly is in my Banga soup Recipe?

palm kernel

Beef: I used beef in this dish, but you can use whatever combination of meat you want, such as tripe, cow leg, or any other beef component you choose.

Onion: A necessary fragrance that enhances the flavour of the beans. You can use any colour you want — white, yellow, or red.

Cameroon Pepper: This is used to give the soup a bit of a kick. If you don’t have Cameroon pepper, you may substitute cayenne pepper or red chilli flakes, and if you want less heat, just leave it out. Fresh shrimp, crayfish, catfish, stockfish (dried cod), dry fish, and periwinkles are examples of seafood. These are some seafood possibilities for you to consider. In this dish, though, I used crayfish, stockfish, and dried fish.

Scotch bonnet or habanero: Either will suffice.

Concentrated palm-nut fruit: I used the ready-made version. However, if you have access to fresh palm nut fruit, you can utilize it.

Banga spice: A dry milled blend of Ataiko and Irugeje. In African markets, it is widely available.

Leaves of Banga spice (Beletete): You can use dried basil, bitter leaf, or fragrance leaves instead.

Stick of Oburunbebe: This is available at African stores and on Amazon.

Dried fish: It should be rinsed and immersed in warm water.

To taste, season with salt and seasoning powder or seasoning cubes.

Water/stock: The palm nut concentrate is fairly thick; a little water is required to loosen it up. I also used the recovered beef stock to enhance the flavour of the soup. If you don’t have any stock on hand, simply add a bit more spice powder (stock cube).

Measures for Making the Most Mouthwatering Banga Soup Recipe

Banga spice: A dry milled blend of Ataiko and Irugeje. In African markets, it is widely available.

Leaves of Banga spice (Beletete): You can use dried basil, bitter leaf, or fragrance leaves instead.

Stick of Oburunbebe: This is available at African stores and on Amazon.

Dried fish: It should be rinsed and immersed in warm water.

To taste, season with salt and seasoning powder or seasoning cubes.

Water/stock: The palm nut concentrate is fairly thick; a little water is required to loosen it up. I also used the recovered beef stock to enhance the flavour of the soup. If you don’t have any stock on hand, simply add a bit more spice powder (stock cube).

How to Make Bang Soup With Fresh Palm Kernel Fruit (Banga)

Boil the palm kernel fruit for 30 minutes, or until tender.

Place the nuts in a mortar and pound gently, being careful not to break them.

Pour some boiling water over the pounded nuts, squeeze, and filter the extract through a sieve a couple of times until you have extracted all of the extracts from the nut.

Pour the extract into a pot and bring to a boil until it thickens and the oil rises to the surface. 

Notes:

In this Banga soup recipe, I used canned palm nut concentrate. This makes the process of producing bangs easier and faster than the old method, which needs you to manufacture your own palm nut extract. However, I’ve included a tip below on how to prepare Banga with fresh palm nut fruit.

Depending on the type of meat, you can boil it for longer or less than 30 minutes. Tougher beef cuts will take longer to cook, whereas softer meat cuts would take less time.

You can get all the spices to prepare this soup from Grainfield Foods. We deliver to your doorstep. Lets us know your thoughts on this soup in the comment section.

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